E-cigarette use poses serious health issues

E-cigarettes — addictive or advantageous?

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Courtesy of Dreamstime.com

Vapes are battery-operated devices that simulate the smoking of actual cigarettes.

E-cigarettes were ostensibly sold to help cigarette users quit smoking tobacco.
However, rather than helping smokers quit, they are creating more users — specifically among the youth.
With the increased usage by minors, there have been countless cases of respiratory disease among them, including pneumonia.
Vapes are battery-operated devices that simulate the smoking of actual cigarettes because they contain a considerable amount of nicotine — an addictive and toxic substance found in cigarettes and other tobacco products.
Companies such as Juul sold vapes in order to help people quit smoking, but research shows that they have a negative impact on health.
The Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are now researching how these devices are affecting human health. They are studying the effects of vaping on those who attempt to quit smoking tobacco.
In a study performed by the FDA and CDC on Feb. 12, 2020, 1,090 samples of vaping fluid were taken from over 31 states. Approximately 843 of the 1,090 samples have undergone extensive testing in the search for unusual chemicals.

Experts from the FDA and CDC suggest not vaping for fun nor for quitting any tobacco products.”

Five hundred and eleven of the samples contained THC, 50% contained Vitamin E acetate. According to the FDA, the use of this particular chemical is concerning because it is associated with many kinds of lung diseases.
Vapes contain less nicotine than regular cigarettes, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that they are safer to use. The oil-based flavors have a substantial amount of nicotine that can still cause damage to the lungs.
In another study conducted by the CDC in 2020, almost 500 cases of respiratory illnesses were reported and analyzed.
Among them, six had died because of lung disease caused by the frequent use of these electronic smoking devices.
Experts from the FDA and CDC suggest not vaping for fun nor for quitting any tobacco products.
In December 2019, Congress passed a federal law raising the legal age to buy tobacco products to 21 in order to minimize the use of e-cigarettes among teens and adults.